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Friday, November 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Pesticide mitigation in museum collections found in the catalog.

Pesticide mitigation in museum collections

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Workshop on Pesticide Mitigation (2007 Washinton, D.C.)

Pesticide mitigation in museum collections

science in conservation proceedings from the MCI workshop series

by Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Workshop on Pesticide Mitigation (2007 Washinton, D.C.)

  • 105 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Museum conservation methods -- Congresses,
  • Decontamination (from gases, chemicals, etc.) -- Congresses,
  • Cleaning -- Congresses,
  • Museum buildings -- Pest control -- Congresses,
  • Museums -- Collections management -- Congresses,
  • Pesticides -- Risk mitigation -- Congresses

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by A. Elena Charola and Robert J. Koestler.
    GenreCongresses
    SeriesSmithsonian contributions to museum conservation -- no. 1
    ContributionsCharola, A. Elena., Koestler, Robert J. 1950-, Museum Conservation Institute.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsAM145 .S65 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23962443M
    LC Control Number2009048678

    FREEZING FOR PEST CONTROL Procedural Guidelines Freezing according to the guidelines below has been shown to be effective in controlling all known museum pests. The procedure is safe for almost all materials, but should be used with caution for materials containing metal armatures and supportFile Size: 60KB.


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Pesticide mitigation in museum collections by Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Workshop on Pesticide Mitigation (2007 Washinton, D.C.) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Pesticide mitigation in museum collections: science in conservation: proceedings from the MCI workshop series. [A Elena Charola; Robert J Koestler; Museum Conservation Institute.;] -- The Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Workshop on Pesticide Mitigation was one of the first professional meetings dedicated to current research on removing pesticide residues.

Smithsonian Contributions to Museum Conservation, i pages; no. 1: 51 figures, 15 tables. The Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Workshop on Pesticide Mitigation was one of the first professional meetings dedicated to current research on removing pesticide residues from museum objects. Seven papers were presented at the workshop, and two more were added to introduce topics.

The Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute Workshop on Pesticide Mitigation was one of the first professional meetings dedicated to current research on removing pesticide residues from museum. destructive to museum collections is people.

The good news for museum professionals is that only a relatively small group of insect species can survive in the museum collections areas. The insects most commonly found in museum collections include clothes moths, carpet beetles,Cited by: 4. Pesticide Mitigation Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) has been reported to be a suitable solvent for removing DDT from museum artifacts without leaving a residue.

When scCO2 was used to remove diazinon, a commo nly used pesticide, from leather samples the results were unsatisfactory. However. Pesticide Mitigation in Museum Collections: Science in Conservation: Proceedings from the MCI Workshop Series.

Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press Health Hazards Associated with Pesticides. Pesticide Mitigation in Museum Collections: Science in Conservation Practical hints on dyeing with natural dyes: Production of comparative dyeings for the identification of dyes on historic textile materials by Helmut Schweppe, (Green Book; 11 MB file).

The Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute workshop on pesticide mitigation is likely the first professional meeting dedicated entirely to current research efforts to remove pesticide residues. Integrated Pest Management for Cultural Heritage by David Pinniger.

A practical, color-illustrated, Pesticide mitigation in museum collections book handbook for the curator, conservator and all persons concerned with the management of collections.

It is an essential guide to the recognition of insect, rodent and bird pests with advice on the practical steps required to prevent and.

in Pesticide Mitigation in Museum Collections: Science in Conservation: Proceedings from the MCI Workshop Series, edited by Koestler, Robert J. and Charola, A. Elena., 65– Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press. The author discusses the use of Phostoxin as a pesticide fumigant on artifact collections at the Royal Ontario Museum in the late s and its effects on artifact materials.

Hawks, Catharine A. and Stephen L. Williams. There are several ways in which museum staff can and should investigate the history of pesticide use in their collections: Research museum records. Often clues to pesticide use can be found in acquisition records, museum staff correspondence and, when they exist, early treatment reports.

Collections care personnel, library patrons, researchers, or others may handle the treated collections and thus expose themselves to pesticide residues, which may be toxic to humans. This was especially evident when many mammalogy, ornithology, herpetology, and anthropology collections were treated with arsenic soap or powders in the ’s.

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON USE OF BIOCIDES IN MUSEUM COLLECTIONS. The following list collects references of books, articles and web resources on the subject of use of biocides (including pesticides) in museum collections and related subjects such as health hazards, handling and mitigation strategies.

Chronology Of Pesticides Used On National Park Service Collections The history of National Park Service pesticide use policy for museum collection objects is documented in various publications including Field Manual for Museums (Burns), Manual for Museums (Lewis), versions of the Museum Handbook, Part I, and two versions of the.

Conservation of cultural heritage involves protection and restoration using "any methods that prove effective in keeping that property in as close to its original condition as possible for as long as possible." Conservation of cultural heritage is often associated with art collections and museums and involves collection care and management through tracking, examination, documentation.

Working Group on Ethnographic Collections Bibliography on Use of Biocides in Museum Collections The following is a list of articles and web resources on the subject of use of biocides (including pesticides) in museum collections and related subjects such as health hazards, handling and mitigation strategies.

Integrated Pest Management Working Group (IPM-WG) This is a "group of collection managers, conservators, entomologists and other professionals interested in issues surrounding the implementation of integrated pest management in museums and other collection-holding group meets annually, informally hosted by the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

The Getty Museum has been partnering with museums around the world to create conferences on seismic mitigation for museum collections. Locations have included Los Angeles, Athens, Istanbul, Tokyo and in Palermo. From tothe Missouri Pesticide Collection Program has conducted 50 events, collecting more thanpounds of waste pesticide from 1, participants.

Inthe department is again providing Missouri farmers and households with a convenient, free opportunity to properly dispose of unwanted waste pesticides including but not.

Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC–CO 2) has been shown to serve as an environmentally benign substitute for a number of solvents that are typically used for free-radical reactions. 57 Such conventional reaction solvents, as benzene or the chlorinated compound, carbon tetrachloride, can be replaced successfully by SC–CO an example of a free-radical, side-chain bromination of all.

Conservation-restoration (also referred to as conservation and restoration or simply conservation) is a profession devoted to the preservation of tangible cultural heritage for the future.

Conservation activities include examination, documentation, treatment, and collections care, otherwise known as preventive conservation.

[1] All of this work is supported by research and education. Pest Management Bibliography (January ) R. J.,Pesticide mitigation in museum collections: science in conservation: proceedings from the MCI workshop series, Smithsonian integrated pest management at the National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka, Japan, in book.

Rajiv Kohli, in Developments in Surface Contamination and Cleaning: Applications of Cleaning Techniques, 5 Summary. Dense-phase CO 2 in its supercritical state is an established precision cleaning technique with application in many different industries. The gas-like viscosity and the liquid-like density of CO 2 are key characteristics that allow the process to be tuned to the application.

Until his retirement inJerry Podany was head of antiquities conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum. He is the author of When Galleries Shake: Earthquake Damage Mitigation for Museum Collections (Getty Publications, ). pages 7 3/4 x 11 inches color and 35 b/w illustrations 11 tables, 90 charts, diagrams, and maps ISBN uses of museum collections.

Joan Bacharach coordinated the project. Cynthia Murdock, Program Assistant, MMP, assisted with the layout and final editing. Chapters on using museum collections in exhibits, furnished historic structures, and research are being developed. Museum Handbook, Part. From: Nancy Odegaard Date: Tuesday, Novem Dr.

Werner S. Zimmt, Conservation Scientist, passed away peacefully on Septem He would have turned 93 on September Werner was a member of the Arizona State.

Psocids or "Book Lice": a Warning of Dampness (CCI Canada) Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections IPM Working Group.

What’s Eating Your Collection (Collections Trust UK) PESTICIDE RESOURCES. Association of American Pesticide Control Officials. Beyond Pesticides. The Environmental Defense Fund Scorecard.

The Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute (MCI) aims to be the center for specialized conservation and technical collection research for all of the Smithsonian museums and collections. MCI's staff combine state-of-the-art instrumentation and scientific techniques with the knowledge of materials and the history of technology to provide technical research studies and interpretation of art Director: Robert J.

Koestler. Mammalogy collections do well in cold storage conditions that are inhospitable to pests. Osteological collections too are vulnerable to infestation as the fat/grease in the bone is extremely attractive to insects.

Mothballs and substances such as Vapona® are no longer legal. THE LEGAL AND ETHICAL STATUS OF MUSEUM COLLECTIONS Curatorially Motivated Disposals Introduction Good collections management Museums aim to “preserve and transmit knowledge, culture and history” for the benefit of past, present and future members of the public.1 However, the process of review and.

Wendy Jessup Associates, Inc. gave this talk on at the NPS Museum Resource Center. Bob Sonderman, Acting Center Director, introduces Wendy.

Apr 6, - Explore sepperoels's board "C&R Books", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Books, Conservation and Literature pins. Museum integrated pest management is the practice of monitoring and managing pest and environmental information with pest control methods to prevent pest damage to collections and cultural ving cultural heritage is the ultimate goal for most museum collection personnel.

Museum pests come in many different forms: insects, mites, rodents, bats, birds, and fungi and the two most. Museum Church Street Jackson, CA () Hours Fri-Sun:   Testing for Safety: Heavy Metals and Pesticides in Museum Collections.

It is known that the UPenn Museum used arsenic as a pesticide during the years at the beginning of the 20 th century when the Speck Collection was stored in their facility.

Only one of the twenty nine artifacts selected for this study clearly had arsenic applied as a. Need to dispose of old pesticides. x COST = FREE x Safely dispose of outdated or unusable pesticides on November 18th, x Agricultural, commercial, forestry, and institutional waste pesticides from pesticide users in Marion, Clackamas and adjacent counties will be accepted.

Chemicals not included in pesticide products (e.g., fertilizers) will NOT be accepted. Collections management involves the development, storage, and preservation of collections and cultural primary goal of collections management is to meet the needs of the individual collector or collecting institution's mission statement, while also ensuring the long-term safety and sustainability of the cultural objects within the collector's care.

Virginia's Pesticide Collection Program assists agricultural producers, licensed pesticide dealers, pest control firms, golf courses and homeowners with the proper disposal of unwanted pesticides.

The program is an effort by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS), with participation from Virginia Cooperative.

Pesticide Residue. Up until the late 20 th century, the application of toxic pesticides to organic materials in museum collections was a widespread and accepted practice. Compounds made of arsenic or mercury were sometimes sprayed or dusted onto artifacts to prevent pest damage.

Agriculture & Commercial Pesticide and Empty Container Collection Event! When: Friday, J AM to PM Where: J Frank Schmidt & Sons .and Acquired Hazards in Museum Objects: Implications for Care and Use of Collections.

CRM. Nopp– This article discusses inherent and acquired hazards found in museum collections. Pesticide application to museum objects is an acquired hazard and the authors provide an excellent summary of the issues involved."The Effect of Thermal Methods of Pest Control on Museum Collections." pp.

– in Biodeterioration of Cultural Property 3. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Biodeterioration of Cultural Property, July 4 – 7, (edited by C. Aranyanak and C. Singhasiri).